House of Commons love

House of Commons

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The lower house of the UK and Canadian Houses of Parliament

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the lower house of the British parliament

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On March 5, 1904, Prime Minister Arthur Balfour told the House of Commons that the Cabinet had approved an Admiralty request to establish a new base for battleships at Rosyth, on the northern side of the Firth of Forth.

    Castles of Steel

  • This American parliament, with jurisdiction over all colonial legislation, would exercise “all the like rights, liberties and privileges as are held and exercised by and in the House of Commons of Great Britain” but still be “an inferior and distinct branch of the British legislature, united and incorporated with each having a veto power over the acts of the other.”

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • According to Mr. Low's teaching, a single year passed amidst the miasma of the House of Commons would be altogether fatal to any chance of professional success.

    Phineas Finn

  • Every inn-room is lined with pictures of races; telegraphs communicate, every hour, tidings of the heats from Newmarket and Ascot: and the House of Commons adjourns over the ` Derby Day. '

    English Traits (1856)

  • A few years later, a House of Commons committee was sent with a body of soldiers to Somerset House, where the chapel was “licentiously rifled.”

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • Such a lack of appreciation of American mettle was of course rebuffed from time to time in Parliament, and strikingly so in a speech made in the House of Commons on March 27, 1775, by David Hartley:

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • The House of Commons had had enough temporising; the time had come for war.

    Graf Spee

  • Secret societies calling themselves the “Sons of Liberty” after a phrase used in a ringing speech made against the Stamp Act in the House of Commons by Colonel Isaac Barre also arose and pledged themselves to resist any illegitimate parliamentary act or law.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • [185] RALPH CUDWORTH, B.D.: A Sermon Preached before the Honourable House of Commons at Westminster, Mar. 31, 1647 (1st edn.), pp. 3, 14, 42, and 43.

    Bygone Beliefs

  • The bill which had passed in the late session for reforming the constitution of the House of Commons had not touched Ireland, a future measure having been promised to the Irish for their comfort; and Loughshane therefore was, as to Lord Tulla's influence, the same as it had ever been.

    Phineas Finn

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.