Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun An Ancient Greek name, particularly borne by a 6th century Ancient Greek lyric poet from Rhegium in Italy.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Ἴβυκος (Ibukos).

Examples

  • Peter Koomen This colorful slug, Ibycus rachelae, is found on forest leaves at altitudes up to about 6,200 feet.

    Borneo

  • I don't know who Amen Ibycus is, but this suit is way too big for you.

    Who Do You Say I Am

  • One said, "This suit is a bad fit for you, Amen Ibycus."

    Who Do You Say I Am

  • Look at the famous Ibycus, at Anacreon of Teos, and at

    The Thesmophoriazusae

  • A single name would be enough: an Amos or a Malachi or an Ibycus.

    Two in Time

  • And were not the murderers of Ibycus similarly captured?

    Plutarch's Morals

  • Look at the famous Ibycus, at Anacreon of Teos, and at Alcaeus, [557] who handled music so well; they wore headbands and found pleasure in the lascivious dances of Ionia.

    The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2

  • [557] Ibycus, a lyric poet of the sixth century, originally from Rhegium in Magna Graecia.

    The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2

  • Ibycus had now been some time missing and inquired after, they laid hold of this remark, and reported it to the magistrates.

    Plutarch's Morals

  • They were sitting in the theatre, and some cranes flew over their heads, and they laughed and whispered to one another, "Behold the avengers of Ibycus."

    Plutarch's Morals

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