Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A region of northwest Russia between the Gulf of Finland and the White Sea. Inhabited since ancient times by the Karelians, the area later came under Swedish domination and was annexed by Russia (1721). Incorporated as a semiautonomous republic of the USSR (1923), Karelia became a member of the Russian Federation after the collapse of the Soviet Union (1992).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A region to the north of Saint Petersburg in Russia and Finland.
  • proper noun An autonomous republic of Russia, official name the Republic of Karelia.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a region in Finland and Russia between the Gulf of Finland and the White Sea

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Karelia is a region that encompasses both sides of the Finnish/Russian border and the ensemble's music is an exciting and interesting mix of Finnish, Russian and Karelian cultures.

    Another Day in the Ketchup Mine

  • Wood initially founded Karelia, which is named after a musical suite by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius, after the dot-com bust at the beginning of the decade.

    E-Commerce Times

  • The case is reportedly similar to one that took place two years ago in the town of Kandalaksha, in the northern Karelia republic.

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

  • The case is reportedly similar to one that took place two years ago in the town of Kandalaksha, in the northern Karelia republic.

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

  • In Karelia, one bear learned how to [open a coffin].

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

  • The case is reportedly similar to one that took place two years ago in the town of Kandalaksha, in the northern Karelia republic.

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

  • Since 1990, ethnically distinct Russian provinces from Karelia to Tyva had been declaring themselves sovereign states; adopting constitutions, flags, and national anthems; asserting the supremacy of their local laws; and claiming natural resources on their territory.

    The Return

  • In Karelia, one bear learned how to [open a coffin].

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

  • From Karelia on the Finnish border to Sakha in Eastern Siberia, leaders of autonomous republics began demanding new cultural and political rights, adopting their own constitutions, anthems, and flags, asserting the superiority of their laws over federal ones, even declaring themselves sovereign states.

    The Return

  • In Karelia, one bear learned how to [open a coffin].

    Russian Bears Eating Corpses

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