Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A town and (formerly) khanate in present-day Uzbekistan.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Uzbek Xiva.

Examples

  • On the one hand, they seize and carry them off for sale in Khiva and

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Had she not been ransomed she would certainly have been sold in Khiva.

    Glimpses of Life and Manners in Persia

  • Our first destination was the most remote city of the Silk Road, Khiva, where the inner city, Ichan Kala, has been preserved largely as it was in the Middle Ages.

    Scott S. Smith: Art and Architecture of the Silk Road

  • Abdul Qayom, mayor of the Khiva district, which includes Sarkand, said election officials informed him of the closures during a recent meeting in Jalalabad, the largest city in Nangahar.

    Afghans fear election disenfranchisement could harm government support

  • Of these seventy-seven, eight resided in Kabul, seventeen in Tashkurgan, thirty-nine in Bukhara, three in Katta Kurgan, two in Karshi, three in Kolab, one in Charjui, one in Yarkand, and four in Ourganj or Khiva.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • The "tribal" affiliations of these seventy-seven possible recruits were broken down as follows: sixty-seven Paracha, one Lakesar, four Sethi (Mir Ahmad, Ghulam Jelani, and Mokam Din in Khiva, and Rahim Bakhsh in Bukhara), one Matha, one Zargar, one Bhati, one Cabdol.

    Connecting Histories in Afghanistan: Market Relations and State Formation on a Colonial Frontier

  • Outside Khiva, the Russian Gatling guns had stopped a charge cold, as surely as if it had hit a wall.

    The Gun

  • His soldiers faced a holdout at the city of Khiva on the banks of the Amu Darya, where the ruling khan, Muhammed Rahim, refused to recognize Russian rule.

    The Gun

  • I tried to board her at Khiva, but the caravanserai was too crowded, and on the Samarkand road there wasn't the opportunity, which was a pity.

    The Sky Writer

  • They were coming in from all parts of the Red Sands, and beyond, from as far as the Black Sands below Khiva, and Zarafshan and the Bokhara border - Uzbeks with their flat yellow faces and scalp-locks, lean, swarthy Tajiks and slit-eyed Mongols, terrible-looking folk with their long swords and bandy legs - until there must have been close on five thousand riders in that valley alone.

    The Sky Writer

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