Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A canal, 98 km (61 mi) long, of northern Germany connecting the North Sea with the Baltic Sea. Built (1887–1895) to facilitate movement of the German fleet, it was widened and deepened from 1907 to 1914.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • * The trip to Germany was to visit the new locks on the Kiel Canal.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • The chairman was a retired inspector of the department of Ponts et Chaus-sées; General Henry Abbot had recently retired from the United States Army Corps of Engineers; there were a chief of the Manchester Canal, a noted Russian engineer, and a former technical director of the Kiel Canal.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • * The trip to Germany was to visit the new locks on the Kiel Canal.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • The chairman was a retired inspector of the department of Ponts et Chaus-sées; General Henry Abbot had recently retired from the United States Army Corps of Engineers; there were a chief of the Manchester Canal, a noted Russian engineer, and a former technical director of the Kiel Canal.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • As to mirrors in daylight and matches after dark, they were in obvious communication with the German fleet in the Kiel Canal, or wherever it was.

    On Forsyte 'Change

  • On July 31, the German dreadnoughts were moving again, this time west through the Kiel Canal to the naval bases on the North Sea.

    Castles of Steel

  • This could not be done, he cautioned, until either a decisive naval battle had been won against the High Seas Fleet or the Kiel Canal had been blocked so that the German fleet could not shift rapidly between the North Sea and the Baltic.

    Castles of Steel

  • Danzig and Münchou lay at Brunsbüttelkoog at the western end of the Kiel Canal.

    Castles of Steel

  • The German government decided to increase the tonnage of battleships in the naval program, to add six cruisers to the program, and to widen the Kiel Canal to allow the passage of projected ships of the dreadnought type.

    1906, Jan. 10

  • The Kiel Canal may have been hit with an airborne or airmobile attack, we're not sure, but part is under Russian control.

    Red Storm Rising

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