Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a member of a nomadic Turkic tribal confederation, which overran the Eurasian steppe in mid-11th century
  • adjective of or relating to the Kipchak people or their language
  • proper noun the Turkic language of the Kipchak people

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Russian кипчак.

Examples

  • He was made Kush Begi (military commander) and Governor of Ak Mechet, an important fortress on the Syr Daria, in 1847, and in the same year married a girl from Julek, a river town; she is described as "a Kipchak lady of the Golden Horde".

    The Sky Writer

  • Print PagePrint ArticleE-mail ArticleCite Article flourished 14th century also spelled Uzbek, in full Ghiyath Al-din Muhammad Öz Beg Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341.

    Archive 2001-01-01

  • Print PagePrint ArticleE-mail ArticleCite Article flourished 14th century also spelled Uzbek, in full Ghiyath Al-din Muhammad Öz Beg Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341.

    Islam's War to Save the World

  • Having risen to power in 1369, Timur had taken over the Chaghadai khanate, conquered the Kipchak khanate, and, with his capital in Samarkand, was in the process of rebuilding the Mongolian Empire.

    d. The Early Ming

  • Print PagePrint ArticleE-mail ArticleCite Article flourished 14th century also spelled Uzbek, in full Ghiyath Al-din Muhammad Öz Beg Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341.

    Islam's War to Save the World

  • Print PagePrint ArticleE-mail ArticleCite Article flourished 14th century also spelled Uzbek, in full Ghiyath Al-din Muhammad Öz Beg Mongol leader and khan of the Golden Horde, or Kipchak empire, of southern Russia, under whom it attained its greatest power; he reigned from 1312 to 1341.

    Archive 2001-01-01

  • I shall omit his subsequent journeys through Syria and Asia Minor, although they contain many amusing and picturesque incidents, and turn, instead, to his adventures in Kipchak (Southern Russia), which was then governed by a sultan descended in a direct line from Genghis Khan.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 3, March, 1862

  • Southern Russia (Kipchak), then belonging to princes of the line of

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 3, March, 1862

  • Juji, the eldest son, died before his father, and was replaced by his own son Batu, who had for his share the plains of Kipchak, the lower course of the Syr-Daria, the Aral and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • From Juji, the eldest son of Jenghiz Khan, descended the following dynasties of khans: (1) Kipchak, 1224-1502; (2) Astrakhan, 1466-1554;

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

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