Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun French writer who collected Aesop's fables and published them (1621-1695)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Madame de la Sablière called La Fontaine a fabulist, who bore fables as naturally as a plum-tree bears plums.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Such a fame is, of course, not the most resplendent in the world; but to have been the first, and to remain thus far the only, writer of fables enjoying recognition as true poetry, -- this surely is an achievement entitling La Fontaine to monumental mention in any sketch, however summary, of French literature.

    Classic French Course in English

  • Bagot bowed to the inevitable and called La Fontaine and Baldwin to his

    The Canadian Dominion; a chronicle of our northern neighbor

  • "Monsieur Gourville, and you, Monsieur --" and he did not name La Fontaine, "I cannot, without sensible displeasure, see you come to plead for one of the greatest criminals it is the duty of justice to punish.

    The Man in the Iron Mask

  • "Monsieur Pellisson," said he, in a sharp dry tone, "Monsieur Gourville, and you, Monsieur --" and he did not name La Fontaine, "I cannot, without sensible displeasure, see you come to plead for one of the greatest criminals that it is the duty of my justice to punish.

    The Vicomte de Bragelonne Or Ten Years Later being the completion of "The Three Musketeers" And "Twenty Years After"

  • A timeless fable that casts light upon this dispute, "La cigale et la fourmi" "The Grasshopper and the Ant"Âwas told by La Fontaine in the 17th century.

    Henry J. Stern: Tweed Still at It

  • A timeless fable that casts light upon this dispute, "La cigale et la fourmi" "The Grasshopper and the Ant"was told by La Fontaine in the 17th century.

    Henry J. Stern: Tweed Still at It

  • ÂLater, I learned the fable was first written by Aesop 2,600 years ago, but since we were taught French and not Greek, we had to read La Fontaine's version.

    Henry J. Stern: Tweed Still at It

  • Animals recur throughout Gauguin's painting, and the artist's love of the fables of La Fontaine suggests that animals may have carried particular symbolic and allegorical meanings.

    Recurring themes and icons in Gauguin's art

  • ÂLater, I learned the fable was first written by Aesop 2,600 years ago, but since we were taught French and not Greek, we had to read La Fontaine's version.

    Henry J. Stern: Tweed Still at It

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