Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun another name of Sparta

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Λακεδαίμων (Lakedaimōn).

Examples

  • 591 C. [11] See Pater, "Plato and Platonism," "Lacedaemon," p. 196 foll.

    The Economist

  • Then the goddess [Aphrodite] spoke to her [Helen] in the likeness of an old woman, a wool-comber who used to card wool for her when she lived in Lacedaemon… “Come here!”

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Then the goddess [Aphrodite] spoke to her [Helen] in the likeness of an old woman, a wool-comber who used to card wool for her when she lived in Lacedaemon… “Come here!”

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Then the goddess [Aphrodite] spoke to her [Helen] in the likeness of an old woman, a wool-comber who used to card wool for her when she lived in Lacedaemon… “Come here!”

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Then the goddess [Aphrodite] spoke to her [Helen] in the likeness of an old woman, a wool-comber who used to card wool for her when she lived in Lacedaemon… “Come here!”

    In the Valley of the Shadow

  • Is there any land of the same name as Lacedaemon or Troy?

    Helen

  • Trojan dames made subject to Achaea's spear, on the day that there came to their plains one who sped with foreign oar across the dashing billows, bringing to Priam's race from Lacedaemon thee his hapless bride,

    Helen

  • Trojan dames made subject to Achaea's spear, on the day that there came to their plains one who sped with foreign oar across the dashing billows, bringing to Priam's race from Lacedaemon thee his hapless bride,

    Helen

  • Anon there came to Lacedaemon from Phrygia's folk the man who, legend says, adjudged the goddesses 'dispute; in robes of gorgeous hue, ablaze with gold, in true barbaric pomp; and he, finding Menelaus gone from home, carried Helen off with him to his steading on Ida, a willing paramour.

    Iphigenia at Aulis

  • Anon there came to Lacedaemon from Phrygia's folk the man who, legend says, adjudged the goddesses 'dispute; in robes of gorgeous hue, ablaze with gold, in true barbaric pomp; and he, finding Menelaus gone from home, carried Helen off with him to his steading on Ida, a willing paramour.

    Iphigenia at Aulis

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