Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A member of a mythical Greek tribe called the Laestrygonians.
  • adj. Of or relating to the mythical Greek tribe called the Laestrygonians.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ‘Even so I spake, but their spirit within them was broken, as they remembered the deeds of Antiphates the Laestrygonian, and all the evil violence of the haughty Cyclops, the man-eater.

    Book X

  • And without the town they fell in with a damsel drawing water, the noble daughter of Laestrygonian Antiphates.

    Book X

  • The Laestrygonian of the Last Battle is introduced as a pre-historic Norseman.

    The World's Desire

  • Laestrygonian, and all the evil violence of the haughty

    The Odyssey

  • Aeolus, who received him hospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not to reach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out to sea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, where the people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himself and his own ship only.

    The Odyssey

  • Sickening in the Laestrygonian amphora for me refine;

    Horace

  • Her shores were, to the polished race which dwelt by the Bosphorus, objects of a mysterious horror, such as that with which the Ionians of the age of Homer had regarded the Straits of Scylla and the city of the Laestrygonian cannibals.

    The History of England, from the Accession of James II — Volume 1

  • He told her all about the Cyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten his brave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received him hospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not to reach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out to sea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, where the people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himself and his own ship only.

    The Odyssey

  • “The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which the people draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, till presently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetch water, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named

    The Odyssey

  • “Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how they had been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savage ogre Polyphemus.

    The Odyssey

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