Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic genus within the family Diatomyidae — consisting of the single species of rodent, the Laotian rock rat.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek λαο- (lao-, "stone") (punning on Lao, from the place of its discovery) + νάστης (nastēs, "inhabitant").

Examples

  • Last year, a new and unusual species of rodent was discovered in Laos, called Laonastes aenigmamus, or kha-nyou.

    The Panda's Thumb: March 2006 Archives

  • Laonastes and the “Lazarus effect” in Recent mammals.

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • As Dawson et al. (2006) note, late survivors that represent ‘the reappearance of taxa after a lengthy hiatus in the fossil record’ are termed ‘Lazarus taxa’, and Dromiciops and Laonastes can both be described this way.

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • The Laonastes aenigmamus was "discovered" by western scientists in remote villages of Laos who were thrilled to find a mammal that they thought had been extinct for 11 million years.

    03/10/2006

  • Laonastes aenigmamus, the Laotian rock rat, is the only known survivor of a morphologically distinctive family of rodents; check out the distinctive jaw.

    Laonastes/ Diatomys/ kha-nyou/ rat-squirrel - The Panda's Thumb

  • Photos of the skull and an 11 million year old fossil can be found in “Laonastes/Diatomys/kha-nyou/rat-squirrel”, on Pharyngula.

    The Panda's Thumb: March 2006 Archives

  • The Laotian rock rat (Laonastes aenigmamus), as the long-whiskered and stubby-legged rodent is now known, is a species believed to have been extinct for 11 million years.

    Mongabay.com News

  • The second ‘late survivor’ brings us back to rodents: it’s the Laotian kha-nyou Laonastes aenigmamus, described last year as representing an entirely new hystricognath lineage, the Laonastidae (Jenkins et al. 2005).

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • Firstly, I’m quite excited about the new paper in Science showing that the recently described Laotian rodent Laonastes isn’t actually an entirely new taxon, but in fact belongs to a group otherwise known only as fossils, the Diatomyidae.

    Archive 2006-03-01

  • But - how cool is this - Dawson et al. (2006) have shown that Laonastes is in fact a living representative of Diatomyidae, a group otherwise known only as fossils, and with a fossil record that doesn’t extend beyond the Upper Miocene.

    Archive 2006-03-01

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