Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic family within the superfamily Lemuroidea — the lemurs.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Lemur +‎ -idae

Examples

  • Aerodynamic model for the early evolution of feathers provided by Propithecus (Primates, Lemuridae).

    Archive 2006-09-01

  • Till recently the aye-aye was regarded as representing a family by itself -- the _Chiromyidae_; but the discovery that it resembles the other lemurs of Madagascar in the structure of the inner ear, and thus differs from all other members of the group, has led to the conclusion that it is best classed as a subfamily (_Chiromyinae_) of the _Lemuridae_.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1 "Austria, Lower" to "Bacon"

  • Even the Lemuridae show very numerous divergent conditions, much more so the Eocene mammals

    Evolution in Modern Thought

  • From the ranks of American investigators we may single out in particular the eminent geologist Cope, who championed with much decision the idea of the specific difference of _Homo neandertalensis_ (_primigenius_) and maintained a more direct descent of man from the fossil Lemuridae.

    Evolution in Modern Thought

  • The platyrrhine and catarrhine monkeys have their primitive ancestor among extinct forms of the Lemuridae.

    Evolution in Modern Thought

  • Lemuridae (Nuttall) gives no reaction or an extremely weak one, that of the other mammals none whatever.

    Evolution in Modern Thought

  • We may thus ascend to the Lemuridae; and the interval is not very wide from these to the Simiadae.

    Evolution in Modern Thought

  • He thus restored Linne's order of the Primates (excluding the bats), and divided it into three sub-orders, the first composed of the half-apes (Lemuridae), the second of the true apes (Simiadae), the third of men (Anthropidae).

    The Evolution of Man — Volume 2

  • Although no graduated links of structure, fitted for gliding through the air, now connect the Galeopithecus with the other Lemuridae, yet I can see no difficulty in supposing that such links formerly existed, and that each had been formed by the same steps as in the case of the less perfectly gliding squirrels; and that each grade of structure had been useful to its possessor.

    On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life

  • Galeopithecus with the other Lemuridae, yet I can see no difficulty in supposing that such links formerly existed, and that each had been formed by the same steps as in the case of the less perfectly gliding squirrels; and that each grade of structure had been useful to its possessor.

    On the origin of species

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