Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or relating to the river Lethe, one of the four rivers of Hades. Those who drank from it experienced complete forgetfulness.
  • adj. Of or relating to death or forgetfulness.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But by the same token, tracks like "Year of Affliction", "Lethean", and "Suffocate" show that the band is equally able to thrash just as hard as any "tough-guy" hardcore band in the modern scene.

    PopMatters

  • In fact, one of the best moments of contrast on the whole album occurs in the middle section, where "Lethean", the album's heaviest track, is bookended by two of its most melodic, "Forsaken" and "Oblivion".

    PopMatters

  • The boundless opportunities of this heaven of legal concepts were open to all properly qualified jurists, provided only they drank the Lethean draught which induced forgetfulness of terrestrial human affairs.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Obama Elaborates on “Empathy,” What He Wants in a Supreme Court Nominee:

  • But for the most accomplished jurists the Lethean draught was entirely superfluous.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Obama Elaborates on “Empathy,” What He Wants in a Supreme Court Nominee:

  • What Lethean waters were these floods of telegraphed intelligence!

    Sister Carrie

  • But this Lethean medicine to a wounded mind was but a temporary blessing; the entrance of La Motte dissolved the illusions of the page, and awakened her to a sense of her own situation.

    The Romance of the Forest

  • Now on the whole face of the uninhabited globe there is perhaps no spot more dull to look at, more Lethean in its aspect, more corpse-like or more cadaverous than Spanish Town.

    Tales of all countries

  • The Atlantic is a Lethean stream, in our passage over which we have had an opportunity to forget the Old World and its institutions.

    Walking

  • We have drunken of things Lethean, and fed on the fullness of death, [Footnote: _Hymn to Proserpine_.] show that in a revulsion from the asceticism of the puritan, no less than in a revulsion from the stupidity of the plain man, it may become easy for the poet to carry his _carpe diem_ philosophy very far.

    The Poet's Poet : essays on the character and mission of the poet as interpreted in English verse of the last one hundred and fifty years

  • It is this mood of wearied, benumbed, discouraged, hopeless hope, feebly seeking for the "Lethean peace of the skies" only to find the mind inevitably reverting to the "lost Ulalume," that finds expression.

    Selections from Poe

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.