Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A female given name.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

First recorded in 16th century Scotland, a variant of Lilian or possibly from the Spanish Liliosa, name of a 9th century saint, both ultimately from Late Latin lilium ("lily").

Examples

  • In an uncharacteristically poetic moment they called her Lilias, a name taken from one of the portraits of long-dead Brandons that hung at the Hall.

    Rose cottage

  • "Lilias," said her aunt, drawing her towards her, and kissing her fondly, "you have been my own brave, patient lassie to-day.

    The Orphans of Glen Elder

  • What Lilias retained throughout life however was the artist soul which connected her deeply to the earth and people of her adopted land.

    Terry Kelhawk: Skirts on Camels: Early Women Travel Writers

  • Her published books like Between the Desert and the Sea and her private journals are filled with poetic thoughts and analogies, punctuated by charming watercolors, through which Lilias records the spiritual messages she absorbed from almost everything she saw.

    Terry Kelhawk: Skirts on Camels: Early Women Travel Writers

  • Lilias Trotter was told by John Ruskin, the preeminent Victorian trend-setter and art critic, that if she trained with him she could be the premier artist of her day.

    Terry Kelhawk: Skirts on Camels: Early Women Travel Writers

  • Lilias frequently went north to Europe in broken health, but always returned to her beloved Algeria where she had a long, productive life.

    Terry Kelhawk: Skirts on Camels: Early Women Travel Writers

  • “Over heavens forbode, my Lady!” answered Lilias; “I have lived too long with gentles, I praise my stars for it, to fight with either follies or fantasies, whether they relate to beast, bird, or boy.”

    The Abbot

  • The domestics around her, less jealous, or less scrupulous than Lilias, acted as servants usually do, following the bias, and flattering, for their own purposes, the humour of the Lady; and the boy soon took on him those airs of superiority, which the sight of habitual deference seldom fails to inspire.

    The Abbot

  • “On my word, Lilias,” said the Lady, “one would think you had received harm from the poor boy — or is he so far on the frosty side of your favour because he enjoys the sunny side of mine?”

    The Abbot

  • [Footnote: A species of battle-axe, so called as being in especial use in that ancient burgh, whose armorial bearing still represent an armed horseman brandishing such a weapon.] “But this imp of Satan is none of your friends or fellow-servants,” said Lilias; “and I trust you mean not to stand up for him against the whole family besides?”

    The Abbot

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.