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Examples

  • The tortured syntax of “The Love-Letters” makes it far less affecting to me than other Hardy poems.

    Taste Tests, Thomas Hardy, Peter Van Toorn and consistent reception

  • Romances, Poems, Love-Letters, and the like: At which the good

    A Patch-Work Screen for the Ladies

  • In the long novel, Love-Letters between a Nobleman and his Sister (1684-87), she asks a question, foreshadowed in many of her plays: is it possible to be a female rake, a woman libertine?

    Aphra Behn (1640-1689)

  • And her thoughts are, that no body has deserved it better, for by night and by day she waited upon them, and was very diligent and faithfull in conveyance of their Love-Letters; but all upon fair promises, having carried her self in the time of their wooing almost like a Bawd to the Bride; for which she never had in all the time but three gratuities from the Bridegroom,

    The Ten Pleasures of Marriage and the Second Part, The Confession of the New Married Couple

  • As a specimen of the playful and beautiful ingenuity of his mind, we extract a portion of his little poem on "Love-Letters made of Flowers."

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 01, November, 1857 A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics

  • The tragedy “Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lunenburgh,” known to be of her make, was a complete failure, and “Love-Letters on All Occasions” (1730) with “Collected by Mrs. Eliza Haywood” on the title-page never reached a second edition.

    The Life and Romances of Mrs Eliza Haywood

  • “A Book of Novels” and “The New Atalantis, with a Key to it,” which last Lady Mary Montagu also enjoyed, and the dissolute country-gentleman's daughters (“Spectator” No. 128) who “read Volumes of Love-Letters and Romances to their Mother,” a ci-devant coquette, give us perhaps a more accurate idea of the woman novelist's public.

    The Life and Romances of Mrs Eliza Haywood

  • We do not need Petrarca, much less the Love-Letters of a Violinist -- no, we do not need those Love-Letters at all -- to prove that a master can draw sweet strains from communion with one mistress, from a lute with one string; a formidable array of songsters, on the other hand, will demonstrate how much fuller and richer the melody grows when the instrument is provided with the requisite five, the desirable fifty.

    Alone

  • By the Author of "The Love-Letters of the King," etc. 12mo.

    Susan Clegg and Her Friend Mrs. Lathrop

  • Lady Mary Wortley Montague's Love-Letters are considered models in their way; and they contain hardly a quotation, or a figure of speech, although she possessed a great reputation for wit and brilliancy of language.

    A Manual of Etiquette with Hints on Politeness and Good Breeding

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