Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One devoted to the acquisition of wealth, or the service of Mammon.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Mammon +‎ -ite

Examples

  • As Palast shows again and again, the Mammonite economic system sucks the wealth straight up to the super rich.

    Exposing Mammon's War in Iraq

  • We no longer will allow a Mammonite culture that preaches society is merely a collection of individuals engaged in a dog-eat-dog struggle for supremacy.

    A Liberal American Agenda

  • You are truly a champion of greed and deserve to be eternally remembered for your many years of truly outstandingly selfish service as a master Mammonite.

    John Stossel is Inducted into Mammon's Hall of Fame

  • When a Mammonite mother kills her babe for a burial fee, 45

    Maud. Part I

  • When a Mammonite mother kills her babe for a burial fee,

    Famous Reviews

  • When a Mammonite mother kills her babe for a burial fee,

    From Chaucer to Tennyson

  • I was agreeably surprised, on being shown into the little back office at the back of the shop, to meet with a tolerably gracious reception from the good-natured Mammonite.

    Alton Locke, Tailor and Poet An Autobiography

  • If he will desert his own class; if he will try to become a sham gentleman, a parasite, and, if he can, a Mammonite, the world will compliment him on his noble desire to "_rise in life_."

    Alton Locke, Tailor and Poet An Autobiography

  • It suits the venal Mammonite press well enough to jumble them together, and cry 'Murder, rape, and robbery,' whenever the six points are mentioned; but they know, and any man of common sense ought to know, that the Charter is just as much an open political question as the Reform Bill, and ten times as much as

    Alton Locke, Tailor and Poet An Autobiography

  • At the time I repudiated the false rumour openly; ” with all the greater readiness, inasmuch as I dispute both the justice of hereditary honour and the wisdom of hereditary legislation; to say less of the “res angusta domi” which, in our Mammonite time and clime, obliges money to support rank, even if, as in sundry late cases of raising to the peerage, it does not purchase it.

    My Life as an Author

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