Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Mannerist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Goldberger states that he finds this synthesis in Italian Mannerists like Michelangelo and Romano; Sir John Soane; the

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  • "Mannerists," which means that they adopted or imitated the manner or style of some great master who had preceded them -- and this was done in so cold and spiritless a way that it may be said that true artistic inspiration was dead in Italy.

    A History of Art for Beginners and Students Painting, Sculpture, Architecture

  • I leave Botticcelli to find the round blue room of Mannerists.

    The Memory Palace

  • I leave Botticcelli to find the round blue room of Mannerists.

    The Memory Palace

  • At the same time, he can be seduced at any moment by the sinuous lines and vibrant hues of the Antwerp Mannerists.

    Gossart

  • It was the 17th century Italian painters - the Mannerists, the Roman School - that he thought were the great names.

    Fairfield Porter by Paul Cummings

  • It was the 17th century Italian painters - the Mannerists, the Roman School - that he thought were the great names.

    Archive 2009-02-01

  • The Northwest Passage that the Mannerists, the Romantics, and two generations of American high school students have searched for does not seem to exist.

    Taste for Makers

  • The most of these followers find classification under the Mannerists of the Decadence.

    A Text-Book of the History of Painting

  • These men are known in art history as the Mannerists, and the men whose works they imitated were chiefly Raphael, Michael Angelo, and Correggio.

    A Text-Book of the History of Painting

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