Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun The name given by the Icelandic Norseman Leifur Eiríksson to the portion of North America in modern-day Labrador, Canada when he arrived there circa 1000 AD.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Norse, coined by Leif Ericson, circa 1000 AD, Blend of mark and land

Examples

  • Then he came to a {20} flat country with white beaches of sand, which he called Markland because it was so well wooded.

    Canada

  • Standing out to sea again, they reached a level wooded country with white sandy cliffs, which they called Markland, or Land of

    Christopher Columbus and the New World of His Discovery — Complete

  • Standing out to sea again, they reached a level wooded country with white sandy cliffs, which they called Markland, or Land of

    Christopher Columbus and the New World of His Discovery — Volume 1

  • Standing out to sea again, they reached a level wooded country with white sandy cliffs, which they called Markland, or Land of Wood, which is our Nova Scotia.

    Christopher Columbus

  • It may be fairly assumed, however, that the rocky land was the coast of Labrador; the low-lying forest-clad shores which Ericson called Markland was possibly the southeastern part of Cape Breton or the southern coast of Nova Scotia; Vinland was very likely somewhere in

    Canada

  • Leif's booths, which Leif had erected in the unknown land called Markland, which may or may not have been Rhode Island, the Skroelings -- and the Lord

    Indian Tales

  • Karlsefne, that nine hundred years ago when Karlsefne's galleys came to Leif's booths, which Leif had erected in the unknown land called Markland, which may or may not have been Rhode Island, the

    The Phantom Rickshaw and Other Ghost Stories

  • The corps called the Markland gate failure a unique occurrence.

    daytondailynews.com - News

  • The corps called the Markland gate failure a unique occurrence.

    News for NBC4i.com

  • Was it Thorwald, Leif's brother, or the mother of Snorri, first white child born in America, who caught first glimpse through the flying spray of Labrador's domed hills, -- "Helluland, place of slaty rocks"; and of Nova Scotia's wooded meadows, -- "Markland"; and Rhode Island's broken vine-clad shore, -- "Vinland"?

    Canada: the Empire of the North Being the Romantic Story of the New Dominion's Growth from Colony to Kingdom

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