Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A site in northern England west of York. The first major Parliamentarian victory of the English Civil War occurred here on July 2, 1644.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a battle in 1644 in which the Parliamentarians under the earl of Manchester defeated the Royalists under Prince Rupert
  • noun a former moor in northern England

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Marston Moor," a frigate of fifty-four guns, in October 1654, and had seen two years 'service in the West Indies under Goodson in 1656 and

    The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century

  • York, and to fight the desperate action of Long – Marston Moor, in which Prince Rupert and the Marquis of Newcastle were defeated.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Cromwell, of course, had been a very clever field officer, as evidenced by his victories at Marston Moor and Naseby.

    The Blackstone Key

  • Cromwell, of course, had been a very clever field officer, as evidenced by his victories at Marston Moor and Naseby.

    The Blackstone Key

  • Cromwell, of course, had been a very clever field officer, as evidenced by his victories at Marston Moor and Naseby.

    The Blackstone Key

  • One wonders what side he would have been on at Marston Moor.

    Today's MPs must stand up for the rights won by their predecessors

  • Naseby, at Winchester, at Marston Moor near York, at Newcastle, and in many other parts of England and Scotland.

    A Child's History of England

  • These are the wives and the daughters of those who met in peace, and sate at the same table, and were allied by marriage or by blood; and yet, after a certain day in August 1642, never smiled upon each other again, nor met but in the field of battle; and at Marston Moor, at

    Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

  • The impact of the Cavalier defeat at Marston Moor for two of the participants in the battle was great.

    The Pawprints of History

  • When the news of the events at Marston Moor reached the Parliament, the rejoicing among the Roundheads knew no bounds.

    The Pawprints of History

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