Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun Obsolete form of Martinmas.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “Not the death of a man,” said Long Allen, to whom the King looked as he spoke; “but methinks I would not die like a poisoned rat for the sake of a black chattel there, that is bought and sold in a market like a Martlemas ox.”

    The Talisman

  • “A hogshead of ale at Martlemas, of the double strike, and single ale at pleasure, as he shall agree with the Cellarer —”

    The Monastery

  • Martlemas or Martinmas was “the customary time for hanging up provisions to dry which had been salted for the winter.

    Scene VI

  • I was just turned sixteen that Martlemas, and not a fair-sized wench for my years either.

    A Brother To Dragons and Other Old-time Tales

  • 'Twas one day nigh unto Martlemas that old Butter did undertake to chide her for conducting herself after the manner o 'a lad rather than o' a lass.

    A Brother To Dragons and Other Old-time Tales

  • Which on a Martlemas Day Mr. Robert had bought for a fairing:

    From "Dorothy: a Country Story." III. Dorothy's Room by Arthur Joseph Munby

  • King looked as he spoke, ` ` but methinks I would not die like a poisoned rat for the sake of a black chattel there, that is bought and sold in a market like a Martlemas ox. ''

    The Talisman

  • "A hogshead of ale at Martlemas, of the double strike, and single ale at pleasure, as he shall agree with the Cellarer --"

    The Monastery

  • I. i.211 (203,4) [upon Allhallowmas last, a fortnight afore Michaelmas?] [Theobald suspected that Shakespeare had written "Martlemas."]

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • He had plenty of malt to make good ale — “And Martlemas beef to him was not dainty;

    Old Cookery Books and Ancient Cuisine

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.