Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Cape

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His historical imagination flares and unfolds layer on layer of associations, until one small part of Greece takes on near-universal cultural significance, from Byzantine connections in the village of Kardamyli to the entrance to Hades near Cape Matapan.

    So No More He'll Go A-Roving

  • He stayed on deck throughout the Battle of Cape Matapan south of Greece in the Mediterranean, directing a searchlight on enemy cruisers while his own ship was repeatedly dive-bombed.

    The Long Route To Windsor

  • His historical imagination flares and unfolds layer on layer of associations, until one small part of Greece takes on near-universal cultural significance, from Byzantine connections in the village of Kardamyli to the entrance to Hades near Cape Matapan.

    So No More He'll Go A-Roving

  • The tenth we were as farre shot as Capo Matapan; and that day we entered the

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Troubridge then signaled Milne, “Goeben is going towards Matapan.”

    Castles of Steel

  • Then, at 4: 40 in the afternoon, when the mountains of Cape Matapan, the central southern promontory of the Peloponnesian Peninsula, appeared on his port bow, with his coal nearly exhausted and with stern orders from Milne forbidding him to go beyond Matapan, Kelly broke off.

    Castles of Steel

  • He touched the rudder and the Matapan swung away to port, heading to by-pass the X 13 to the south: to have gone to the north, the right, would have brought the Matapan under the glare of the arc and floodlights that illuminated the big working platform round the derrick.

    Fear is the Key

  • As he did so John cut the engine to the merest whisper, and the Matapan, urged by the swell, drifted slowly back past one side of the pillar while the lifebelt came back on the other, so passing the light line completely round the pillar.

    Fear is the Key

  • Both men and vessel were Greek: the crew were Greeks to a man and if the Matapan wasn't entirely Grecian, she had at least been built by Greek shipwrights who had come to and settled down in Florida just for the express purpose of building those sponge ships.

    Fear is the Key

  • And even were I aboard the Matapan I didn't want to leave the vicinity of the rig.

    Fear is the Key

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