Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Matelote, large, plump, redhaired, and noisy, the favorite ex-sultana of the defunct Hucheloup, was homelier than any mythological monster, be it what it may; still, as it becomes the servant to always keep in the rear of the mistress, she was less homely than Mame

    Les Miserables

  • Matelote and Gibelotte had mingled with the workers.

    Les Miserables

  • Matelote, and Gibelotte, variously modified by terror, which had stupefied one, rendered another breathless, and roused the third, were tearing up old dish-cloths and making lint; three insurgents were assisting them, three bushy-haired, jolly blades with beards and moustaches, who plucked away at the linen with the fingers of seamstresses and who made them tremble.

    Les Miserables

  • Matelote had mounted to the first floor once more, Grantaire seized her round her waist, and gave vent to long bursts of laughter at the window.

    Les Miserables

  • _Matelote_ may come in with the brown sauces, although it is not made with Spanish sauce as a foundation, but only with strong stock.

    Choice Cookery

  • _Au 'voir_ to thee, _La Matelote_, thou fair and fair and toothsome fish stew, and to thee, _Perdreau Farci à la Stuért_, thou aristocratic twelve-franc seducer of the esophagus!

    Europe After 8:15

  • Grantaire added to the eccentric accentuation of words and ideas, a peculiarity of gesture; he rested his left fist on his knee with dignity, his arm forming a right angle, and, with cravat untied, seated astride a stool, his full glass in his right hand, he hurled solemn words at the big maid-servant Matelote: --

    Les Miserables, Volume IV, Saint Denis

  • He besought Love to give it life, and this produced Matelote.

    Les Miserables, Volume IV, Saint Denis

  • Two serving-maids, named Matelote and Gibelotte, and who had never been known by any other names, helped Mame Hucheloup to set on the tables the jugs of poor wine, and the various broths which were served to the hungry patrons in earthenware bowls.

    Les Miserables, Volume IV, Saint Denis

  • Note: Matelote: a culinary preparation of various fishes.

    Les Miserables, Volume IV, Saint Denis

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