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  • Better known by his Latin name Mercurialis, famous philologist and physician, b. at Forli, 30 September, 1530; d. there, 13 November,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • Mercurialis another, and another that was often minded to despatch himself, and so continued for many years.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • A hot liver, and a cold stomach, are put for usual causes of melancholy: Mercurialis consil.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Mercurialis, consil. 20, had a woman to his patient, that from melancholy became epileptic and blind.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Other things are much magnified [4139] by writers, as an old cock, a ram's head, a wolf's heart borne or eaten, which Mercurialis approves; Prosper Altinus the water of Nilus; Gomesius all seawater, and at seasonable times to be seasick: goat's milk, whey,

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Mercurialis, Montaltus, &c. [1506] Fernelius saith, A thick air thickeneth the blood and humours.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Physic (as Hippocrates defines it) is nought else but [2882] addition and subtraction; and as it is required in all other diseases, so in this of melancholy it ought to be most accurate, it being (as [2883] Mercurialis acknowledgeth) so common an affection in these our times, and therefore fit to be understood.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • So that which Mercurialis, consil. 11, sometimes expostulated with his melancholy patient, may be justly applied to every solitary and idle person in particular.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Mercurialis, new and old physicians, hold that such air is unwholesome, and engenders melancholy, plagues, and what not?

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Mercurialis admires the emerald for its virtues in pacifying all affections of the mind; others the sapphire, which is the

    Anatomy of Melancholy

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