Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Miranda do Douro (in the northeast corner of Portugal), its people, their culture, or their now-endangered Romance language.
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Miranda do Douro in northeastern corner of Portugal.
  • proper n. An endangered Romance language spoken in the northeastern corner of Portugal, principally in the municipalities of Miranda do Douro and Vimioso.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Languages: Portuguese (official), Mirandese (official - but locally used)

    Portugal

  • PortugalPortuguese (official), Mirandese (official - but locally used)

    Languages

  • Portuguese (official), Mirandese (official - but locally used)

    The 2004 CIA World Factbook

  • Because written Mirandese resembles Spanish and Portuguese, I could at least catch the drift of the stories and essays in the journal - some of which were clearly personal and others which seemed to be recounting folk tales told by family or neighbors - stories of hens and monsters and shepherds and religion.

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  • History lent a poignant note to the texts: Mirandese had been forbidden under the Portuguse dictator António de Oliveira Salazar who ruled from 1932 to 1968; many of the students' parents had not learned to speak Mirandese, let alone write it.

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  • Instead, he gave me several editions of La Gameta, the annual journal of student works in Mirandese he has professionally published.

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  • Three days wouldn't get me very far, and the language, spoken by just 10,000 or 15,000 people on what is known as the Planalto Mirandês or Mirandese Plateau, who all also speak Portuguese, is hardly a useful tongue.

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  • It's a veal steak cut from the hind quarters of Mirandese cattle, served with a vinaigrette sauce that Lurdinhas claimed was invented by her grandmother for whom the restaurant is named.

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  • I wanted to hear as much as I could of Mirandese, Portugal's second official language - whether from the customers at the nearby Café Córdoba, old men chatting on a bench, or a woman on her way home from shopping.

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  • As I wandered the villages over the next two days, I found fluency in Mirandese to be more common among older villagers, but one of many exceptions is Duarte Martins not related to Altino, a young man from Malhadas who is a Mirandese teacher.

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