Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Chinese philosophy based on the doctrines of Mozi and his followers, especially the concept of universal love.

Etymologies

From Moh, former transliteration of the first syllable of Mozi, Chinese philosopher (c. 470-391 BC), Chinese 墨子 (Mòzǐ). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Classic introduction to classical Chinese thought, Taoism, Mohism, Confucian thought, legalism etc.

    Matthew Yglesias » Influential Books

  • This characterization of benefit and harm in terms of psychological attitudes is a remarkable shift from earlier Mohism.

    Mohist Canons

  • As in early Mohism, “benefit” (li) is the fundamental standard of what is moral or right (yi), which underlies moral duties and virtues: “Morality is benefit”

    Mohist Canons

  • One important difference from earlier Mohism is that the later texts seem to abandon the idea of grounding ethics or social norms in

    Mohist Canons

  • Mohism never achieved a position of dominance or orthodoxy, but at its peak in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE, no school was more influential.

    Mohism

  • Mencius, in the text purporting to be a record of his teachings, explicitly sets himself to the task of defending Confucianism not only against Mohism but the teachings of Yang Zhu.

    Chinese Ethics

  • This article will introduce ethical issues raised by some of the most influential texts in Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, Legalism, and Chinese Buddhism.

    Chinese Ethics

  • Shortly after his passing, around 500 B.C.E., a variety of philosophical teachings emerged, including those associated with Daoism, Mohism, and Legalism.

    Japanese Confucian Philosophy

  • One is there is no correct way to use a name so contrary to Mohism, no standard is “nature's” constant standard of choice of a dao.

    Taoism

  • However, Mohism did advocate a first order normative dao and followed Confucianism in the assumption that an orderly society needs to follow a single constant dao.

    Taoism

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