Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In 2007, Black Box Voting embarked on a year-long investigative series examining elections in what we call the Moonshine territories – reputedly the most corrupt local governments in America.

    Moonshine America? Collapse of the 'Trust Me' elections model

  • "Very true, Bob; a chap without a mouth would be like a ship without a companion hatch; -- talking about that, the combings of my mouth are rather dry -- what do you say, Bob, shall we call Moonshine?"

    Olla Podrida

  • Watman’s new book, Chasing the White Dog: An Amateur Outlaw’s Adventures in Moonshine, brings the image up to date.

    Hipster Moonshine

  • This casino spectacle, titled "Moonshine Follies," was unfolding on a stage not in Las Vegas, which is synonymous with the elaborate stage production, but in Atlantic City, where such shows died out in the 1990s after a comparatively brief East Coast run.

    The Seattle Times

  • Continuing with the Cal Leandros UF series -- finished "Moonshine" the 2nd book.

    True Romance & Friday Book Club

  • Or in those locales where the local community has mandated that it remain illegal (After all, their is still a thriving 'Moonshine' industry despite the legality of alcohol).

    Drugs Should Be Legal

  • And, you know, like "Moonshine," that's part of what that song's about, sitting there with Old Gabe.

    North Mississippi Allstars' 'Electric Blue Watermelon'

  • (Soundbite of "Moonshine") Mr.L. DICKINSON: (Singing) Old Gabe used to blow up and down the picnic ground with Bobby Ray Watson and young Kenny Brown.

    North Mississippi Allstars' 'Electric Blue Watermelon'

  • After coming up against the ruthless urban assassin of the Coffin Dancer, criminalist Lincoln Rhyme and his understudy Amelia Sachs return as the head into the heart of the American "Moonshine" trade to hunt down the Insect Boy.

    Reader reviews of The Empty Chair by Jeffery Deaver.

  • "Moonshine" and the dinner to Mr. Gladstone, 91; 549, 567

    The History of "Punch"

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