Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See Law, 3.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the laws (beginning with the Ten Commandments) that God gave to the Israelites through Moses; it includes many rules of religious observance given in the first five books of the Old Testament (in Judaism these books are called the Torah)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That "though we may PITY the fugitive, yet the Mosaic Law does not authorize the rejection of the claims of the slaveholders to their stolen or strayed PROPERTY."

    Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom

  • The Christian teachers of the first three centuries insisted, as was natural for them, on complete religious liberty; furthermore, they not only urged the principle that religion could not be forced on others -- a principle always adhered to by the Church in her dealings with the unbaptised -- but, when comparing the Mosaic Law and the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • The short-lived attempt of the settlement at New Haven to found a theocratic colony based upon the Mosaic Law is interesting only in its failure.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • No wonder then that Judaism assumed there an attitude of direct antagonism to everything hellenistic, that the Mosaic observances were gradually enforced with extreme rigour, and that the oral Law, or rulings of the Elders relative to such observances appeared in the eyes of pious Judean Jews of no less importance than the Mosaic Law itself.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • His great object was to please the Jews in every way, and he showed great regard for the Mosaic Law and Jewish customs.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • It was the policy of ancient Asiatic empires to grant to each province its autonomy, and the Judean Jews availed themselves of this to live up to the requirements of the Mosaic Law under the headship of their high-priests and the guidance of their scribes.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • The Mosaic Law was a futile barrier because it prescribed good without importing the strength to do it.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

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