Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A river, about 845 km (525 mi) long, of southeast Australia flowing northwest to a tributary of the Darling River.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a river in southeastern Australia that flows generally northwest to join the Darling River

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Look at her skills on the island; tracking, hunting, making shelters, explosives, traps, map making ect … She seems like Namoi from the NPB mayby her crew got them selves killed and she managed to survive.

    The Tail Section » Your Voice: Rousseau - Shipwreck Survivor or Rampant Liar? Part 1

  • Namoi - I'm a freak for calcium and take it nightly ... i'm trying to add in the bananas in hopes that mgiht help?

    Belly By the Numbers

  • This is where Eric farmed for twenty-two years at Cumberdeen, a dozen miles from town, and before that at Bogabri for another twenty-two years, to the east of the Pilliga on the Namoi River.

    Wildwood

  • Driving into town, looking towards the great sweeping expanses of the Liverpool Plains beyond it, Eric spoke of the Kamilaroi Aboriginal people who used to roam them, from Tamworth to the Pilliga region south of the Namoi River.

    Wildwood

  • This is where Eric farmed for twenty-two years at Cumberdeen, a dozen miles from town, and before that at Bogabri for another twenty-two years, to the east of the Pilliga on the Namoi River.

    Wildwood

  • Driving into town, looking towards the great sweeping expanses of the Liverpool Plains beyond it, Eric spoke of the Kamilaroi Aboriginal people who used to roam them, from Tamworth to the Pilliga region south of the Namoi River.

    Wildwood

  • During his journey into the interior he saw it in tolerable abundance at Brezi, on the river Mokai, to the northward of the Liverpool plains; and it was also equally numerous in all the low scrubby ranges in the neighborhood of the Namoi, as well as in the open brushes that intersect the plains on its borders.

    International Miscellany of Literature, Art and Science, Vol. 1, No. 3, Oct. 1, 1850

  • As the junction of the Namoi could not be far distant, Mitchell had thus laid down the course and direction of these two large rivers, although he had as yet seen nothing of the object of his search, the Kindur.

    The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888

  • Nundawar Range, he made back for the Namoi, and proceeded to set up the canvas boats he had with him, intending to try to follow the river in them.

    The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888

  • His attempt was fruitless, one of the boats was soon snagged, and it became evident that it would be much easier to follow the Namoi on horseback.

    The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888

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