Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The husband of Deirdre in Irish legend.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Autobiographies

  • She does not show immediately after the death of Naoise enough sense of what has happened, enough normal despair to permit of a gradual development into the wild unearthly feeling of the last speeches, though these last speeches are exquisitely spoken.

    Autobiographies

  • "Then shall I have speech with Naoise, Ardan, and Ainle," she said, and ere Lavarcam could stop her, she had flitted through the trees by

    A Book of Myths

  • She begged Naoise to let them go to some place of safety and there wait until Fergus had fulfilled his _geasa_ and could rejoin them and go with them to Emain Macha.

    A Book of Myths

  • Deirdrê had sailed yet further north in their galley, and that there, in the land of his mother, Naoise ruled as a king.

    A Book of Myths

  • And Naoise said: "What then, best beloved, dost thou read from this dream of thine?"

    A Book of Myths

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