Napoleonic Wars love

Napoleonic Wars

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a series of wars fought between France (led by Napoleon Bonaparte) and alliances involving England and Prussia and Russia and Austria at different times; 1799-1815

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One of the greatest though somewhat lesser-known figures to come out of the Napoleonic Wars was the Austrian innkeeper Andreas Hofer.

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • One of the greatest though somewhat lesser-known figures to come out of the Napoleonic Wars was the Austrian innkeeper Andreas Hofer.

    Andreas Hofer

  • Henry Poole & Co., the family-run bespoke shop that once made military uniforms during the Napoleonic Wars, does, in fact, have Mr. Potter's file on their ancient books.

    Off With Their Coattails

  • Back in 1834, during the Jackson administration, the French-American rift was trivial, really—largely a matter of bookkeeping: We sought reparations for damage done to American shipping during the Napoleonic Wars, and France was stiffing us.

    The Fiddler in the Subway

  • Back in 1834, during the Jackson administration, the French-American rift was trivial, really—largely a matter of bookkeeping: We sought reparations for damage done to American shipping during the Napoleonic Wars, and France was stiffing us.

    The Fiddler in the Subway

  • The British hogged most of the military glory, but the French really won the siege, their first noteworthy military victory since the Napoleonic Wars.

    Eric Margolis: Ghosts of Sevastopol

  • In 1816 the British Parliament ordered all income-tax pap ers and records burned in a bonfire after Britain ended its first large-scale use, to fund the Napoleonic Wars.

    Summer Books: Forget Novels, Think Tax on the Beach

  • The outcomes of the American Revolution, the Civil War and the Napoleonic Wars it was Napoleon Bonaparte who coined the phrase, "an army marches on its stomach", to name only a few, were all decided in part by which side had better access to provisions.

    Fishing With Grenades and Cooking With C4: A Veteran's Vietnam Food Memories

  • The British hogged most of the military glory, but the French really won the siege, their first noteworthy military victory since the Napoleonic Wars.

    Eric Margolis: GHOSTS OF SEVASTOPOL

  • Back in 1834, during the Jackson administration, the French-American rift was trivial, really—largely a matter of bookkeeping: We sought reparations for damage done to American shipping during the Napoleonic Wars, and France was stiffing us.

    The Fiddler in the Subway

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