Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state of a Nazarite.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proper n. The state of a Nazarite.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or condition of being a Nazarite.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Nazarite +‎ -ship

Examples

  • The Nazarites were men who consecrated themselves by a perpetual or temporary vow to abstain all the days of their Nazariteship, that is, during their separation from the rest of the people, from the use of wine and all other intoxicating drink, from vinegar formed from wine or strong drink, from any liquor of grapes, from grapes dried or fresh, and indeed from the use of anything produced from the vine.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • In the wilderness, in the hill-country of Judea, he passed his youth as a private man; not as an eremite, but employed in some work or study; and assumed nothing of austerity, besides Nazariteship, before the thirtieth year of his age.

    From the Talmud and Hebraica

  • Nazariteship, and to an attendance at the temple with fastings and prayers for seven days, not designing that the offering should be offered till them, which was what he signified to the priest.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • He shall be a Nazarite, set apart to God from every thing that is polluting; in token of this, according to the law of Nazariteship, he shall drink neither wine nor strong drink, -- or, rather, neither old wine nor new; for most think that the word here translated strong drink signifies some sort of wine, perhaps those that we call made wines, or any thing that is intoxicating.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • It denotes also the loss of their joy, for they shaved their heads upon occasion of great mourning; I may add the loss of their Nazariteship, for the shaving of the head was a period to that vow (Num.vi. 18), and Jerusalem was now no longer looked upon as a holy city.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

  • What opiates she might steal into his cup we know not, but we cannot suppose that he knowingly drank wine or strong drink, for that would have been a forfeiture of his Nazariteship as much as the cutting off of his hair.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume II (Joshua to Esther)

  • Nazariteship (v. 22): His hair began to grow again, as when he was shaven, that is, to be as thick and as long as when it was cut off.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume II (Joshua to Esther)

  • Jehu professed that his heart was right with him, that he had a true affection for his person and a veneration for the crown of his Nazariteship, and desired to know whether he had the same affection for him and satisfaction in that crown of royal dignity which God had put upon his head: Is thy heart right?

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume II (Joshua to Esther)

  • Nazarites must not do it, upon pain of forfeiting all the honour of their Nazariteship.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume I (Genesis to Deuteronomy)

  • Nazariteship, and, it is probable, spent much of their time in the study of the law, in acts of devotion, and instructing others.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume I (Genesis to Deuteronomy)

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