Neopythagoreanism love

Neopythagoreanism

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Graeco-Alexandrian school of philosophy, reviving Pythagorean doctrines, which became prominent in the first and second centuries CE.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

neo- +‎ Pythagoreanism

Examples

  • In reading the following account of Neopythagoreanism, it may be helpful to refer to the

    Pythagoreanism

  • Neopythagoreanism began already in the second half of the fourth century BC among Plato's first successors in the Academy, but particularly flourished from the first century BC until the end of antiquity.

    Pythagoreanism

  • The origins of Neopythagoreanism are probably to be found already in Plato's school, the Academy, in the second half of the fourth century BC.

    Pythagoreanism

  • Golden Verses are frequently quoted in the first centuries AD and thus constitute one model of the Pythagorean life in Neopythagoreanism, one that is free from magical practices.

    Pythagoreanism

  • Neopythagoreanism is not a unified school of thought but rather a tendency, stretching over many centuries, to view Pythagoras, with no historical justification, as the central and original figure in the whole Greek philosophical tradition.

    Pythagoreanism

  • There are several different strands in Neopythagoreanism.

    Pythagoreanism

  • A second strand of Neopythagoreanism, while maintaining connection to these metaphysical speculations, emphasizes Pythagoras 'role in the mathematical sciences.

    Pythagoreanism

  • A third strand in Neopythagoreanism emphasizes Pythagoras 'practices rather than his supposed metaphysical system.

    Pythagoreanism

  • After a decline in interest in Pythagoreanism for a couple of centuries, Neopythagoreanism emerged again and developed further starting in the first century BC and extending throughout the rest of antiquity and into the middle ages and Renaissance.

    Pythagoreanism

  • This would include sources dating before the early Academy (ca. 350 BC), where Neopythagoreanism has its origin, and Peripatetic sources contemporary with the early Academy (ca. 350-300 BC, e.g. Aristotle, Aristoxenus and Eudemus), who, under the influence of Aristotle, defined themselves in opposition to the Academic view of Pythagoras.

    Pythagoreanism

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