Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • The possessions of France in North America from the 1500s until the Treaty of Paris (1763), which awarded French holdings to Great Britain and Spain. At its greatest extent it included much of southeast Canada, the Great Lakes region, and the Mississippi Valley. British and French rivalry for control of the territory led to the four conflicts known as the French and Indian Wars (1689–1763).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun historical France's former possessions and colonies in North America, including Quebec, Acadia, and Louisiana, before 1763.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

new + France

Examples

  • So many voyages and discoveries without result, and attended with so much hardship and expense, have caused us French in late years to attempt a permanent settlement in those lands which we call New France, [6] in the hope of thus realizing more easily this object; since the voyage in search of the desired passage commences on the other side of the ocean, and is made along the coast of this region.

    Voyages of Samuel De Champlain — Volume 02

  • After reciting a list of explorations which began with John Cabot and had continued at intervals during the next century, he continues: 'So many voyages and discoveries without results, and attended with so much hardship and expense, have caused us French in late years to attempt a permanent settlement in those lands which we call New France, in the hope of thus realizing more easily this object; since the voyage in search of the desired passage commences on the other side of the ocean and is made along the coast of this region.'

    The Founder of New France : A chronicle of Champlain

  • To these vast regions, with adjacent islands, they had given the name of New France.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • To these vast regions, with adjacent islands, they had given the name of New France.

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • But Louis Hébert was another man with a dream—a true believer in the idea of New France.

    Champlain's Dream

  • But Louis Hébert was another man with a dream—a true believer in the idea of New France.

    Champlain's Dream

  • French had been called New France, but in De Monts 'Patent, that portion of the territory lying east of the Penobscot and embracing the present provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and part of Maine was named

    Acadia or, A Month with the Blue Noses

  • The drainage basin of the St. Lawrence was called New France (or Canada); the lands near Port Royal became another French colony, called Acadia.

    A Brief History of the United States

  • But it was in Quebec, then known as New France, where the first official census was held by intendant Jean Talon, who later became governor.

    Thestar.com - Home Page

  • Still, the province of 7.8 million people always has been a contentious subject: in the 1760s, when the British completed their takeover of what was then called New France; in 1867, when the country of Canada was formed as a dominion under Queen Victoria, and a century later, when it thrilled to visiting French President Charles de Gaulle and his cry of "Vive le Quebec libre!"

    The Seattle Times

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