New Journalism love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Journalism that is characterized by the reporter's subjective interpretations and often features fictional dramatized elements to emphasize personal involvement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A style of news writing and journalism of the 1960s and 1970s, employing literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In all material things the New Journalism is a long way ahead of the Old; and yet, after chronicling its many triumphs -- culminating in the capture of _The Times_ -- its part-creator is fain to admit that "public distrust of news is the most notable feature in journalism of recent years," and that the influence of the daily Press on the public mind has hardly ever been at a lower ebb.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, 1920-03-20

  • The better, one suspects, to ward off the scores of other celebrity sycophants who transparently hope that telling tales of playing shotgun golf or getting blitzed with the man who once walked point among New Journalism's giants will see his anarchic cool rub off on them.

    Buy the Ticket, Take the Ride

  • The movement of New Journalism founded by creative writers like Norman Mailer moves between objective and subjective realities to push the reader into a creative engagement with the lifeworld.

    Relating Indian realities to world history

  • The movement of New Journalism founded by creative writers like Norman Mailer moves between objective and subjective realities to push the reader into a creative engagement with the lifeworld.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • It's a great site and a model for the New Journalism, and I can't wait to see what bubbles up tomorrow and in the months to come.

    Readers, Thank You

  • Felker, who was married to Vanity Fair contributing editor Gail Sheehy, founded New York magazine in 1968 and, as a mentor to Tom Wolfe and many other writers, was integral to the development of New Journalism, which transformed the way magazines were written.

    Clay Felker: 1925–2008: Vanity Fair

  • “Superman Comes to the Supermarket,” his literary take on the 1960 Democratic Convention, is often cited as one of the earliest examples of New Journalism.

    Frank DiGiacomo: VF Daily

  • “Superman Comes to the Supermarket,” his literary take on the 1960 Democratic Convention, is often cited as one of the earliest examples of New Journalism.

    Frank DiGiacomo: Norman Mailer vs. Esquire: Frank DiGiacomo

  • In lesser hands, New Journalism could also be a recipe for self-indulgence, solipsism, and mischievous fictionalization, but that is not the case with Miami and the Siege of Chicago.

    How to Cover an Election

  • He purchased a new queen-size bed for the bedroom and constructed a small library, its bookshelves filled with biographies as well as volumes devoted to history, political science, and New Journalism, including the works of Hunter S.

    American Legacy

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