Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The first day or days of the calendar year.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The first few days of a calendar year.
  • noun In particular, January 1 in the Julian and Gregorian calendar and the days following.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

new + year

Examples

  • Saint Lucy's day is 12/13, the solstice is 12/21, Christmas is 12/25, and the New Year is a week later.

    lulu lumens

  • Saint Lucy's day is 12/13, the solstice is 12/21, Christmas is 12/25, and the New Year is a week later.

    lulu lumens

  • This is why the New Year is the occasion for "purifications," for the expulsion of sins, of demons, or merely of a scapegoat.

    Meditation: In illo tempore

  • Passover to New Year, that is all during the summer, no man can go out of his house because of the sun, for the heat in that country is intense, and from the third hour of the day onward, everybody remains in his house till the evening.

    The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela

  • In China, the New Year is a time for family reunions.

    infoplease - Daily Almanac

  • JORGE CRUISE, "THE 12-SECOND SEQUENCE": When you start off any kind of New Year's resolution to exercise, to be realistic.

    CNN Transcript Jan 26, 2008

  • In Tajik language Navruz means “New Day” and the 21st of March is also a kind of New Year eve.

    Tajikistan: Politicized Navruz

  • Now, THAT's the kind of New Year's celebration that we like!

    New Year, New Hope, New Joy

  • I almost forgot about what kind of New Year's debauchery has gone down year after year in and around "The Bonnie," and it actually made downtown look like a postcard, not like the 9-to-5-only-alive, otherwise neglected, drug-addict inhabited place that it is.

    Archive 2006-04-01

  • I almost forgot about what kind of New Year's debauchery has gone down year after year in and around "The Bonnie," and it actually made downtown look like a postcard, not like the 9-to-5-only-alive, otherwise neglected, drug-addict inhabited place that it is.

    Ciudad - Out of the Pan-Latin, Into the Fuego

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