Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of a people descended from the indigenous Algonquian peoples of Nippenet, corresponding to central Massachusetts and immediately adjacent portions of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Dudek said the Nipmuc natives were living in the Littleton area at the time, and could have been the site of a hut or “tool use area,” or it could be related to a burial site.

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  • The northeast section of Connecticut and part of Massachusetts was occupied by the Nipmuc tribe.

    History of American Women

  • The Pequot, Montaukett, Narragansett, Niantic, Nipmuc, and Shinnecock that were referred to indiscriminately as Mohegan were originally distinct tribes, each with several autonomous bands.

    History of American Women

  • After 1640, the Nipmuc got Christianity from John Eliot and other Puritan missionaries.

    History of American Women

  • Whites took the best farm lands in the river valleys leaving the Nipmuc – who depended heavily on agriculture – unable to properly feed themselves.

    History of American Women

  • There were originally many small American Indian tribes in Connecticut, including the Nipmuc, Mohegan, Pequot, and the Niantic.

    History of American Women

  • Since the Nipmuc homeland starts only thirty miles west of Boston harbor, contacts with English colonists began almost immediately after the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth in 1620 and increased dramatically after the settlement of Massachusetts Bay by the Puritans in 1630.

    History of American Women

  • Large purchases of Nipmuc land by the Puritan colonists during the 1640s and 1650s steadily eroded the tribe's land base, but unregulated settlement squatters took even more.

    History of American Women

  • After their involvement in King Philip's War 1675, the Nipmuc were forced to flee their homes, and their lands were redistributed among the settlers.

    History of American Women

  • The Pocumtuck and Nipmuc refugees at Schaghticoke, however, found themselves in the awkward position of neutrals whose loyalty was suspect to the English, while they were despised by their relatives fighting for the French.

    History of American Women

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