Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Roman poet known for his explorations of love, especially the Art of Love (c. 1 BC) and Metamorphoses (c. AD 8).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A 1st century BC Roman poet.
  • proper noun A male given name of mainly historic use.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun Roman poet remembered for his elegiac verses on love (43 BC - AD 17)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin Ovidius, name of a Roman gens.

Examples

  • Database provider OVID is providing free access to the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals during the month of April: "Each month, Ovid provides you with the opportunity to 'test drive' a sampling of our content, tools and services - FREE of charge - through our Resource of the Month program."

    Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals Available For Free in April

  • Database provider OVID is providing free access to the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals during the month of April: "Each month, Ovid provides you with the opportunity to 'test drive' a sampling of our content, tools and services - FREE of charge - through our Resource of the Month program."

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • I can only think that somewhere, somehow, Ovid is applauding. p.s. I am sure wordpress is about to screw up the formatting of the quote.

    Girl Meets Boy « Tales from the Reading Room

  • Niobe was Queen of Thebes, as related in Ovid, whose children die as the gods 'punishment for her shameful boasting, while she turns to stone.

    Niobe, Regina di Tebe; Faust; The Makropulos Case; Fidelio

  • Today, Ovid is laughing his head off in my library, free for ever from all Caesars, including the Caesar of

    The End Of The Cycle

  • In "Baptizing," from Lives of Girls and Women (1971), Munro wrote eloquently of two young lovers, one of whom has almost drowned the other (men and water again: in Ovid water fuses a couple's sexuality; in Munro it distinguishes and separates).

    Leave Them and Love Them

  • In "Baptizing," from Lives of Girls and Women (1971), Munro wrote eloquently of two young lovers, one of whom has almost drowned the other (men and water again: in Ovid water fuses a couple's sexuality; in Munro it distinguishes and separates).

    Leave Them and Love Them

  • The shape: in Ovid's phrase, a poem is an imago vocis, an image of the voice.

    Deforming Keat's 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

  • How idly I talk; 'tis because the story pleases me – none in Ovid so much.

    Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple (1652-54)

  • The story of Baucis and Philemon is in Ovid's Metamorphoses, viii.,

    Letters from Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple (1652-54)

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