Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. An aboriginal people native to Taiwan.
  • proper n. A person of Paiwan descent.
  • proper n. The Formosan language of the Paiwan people.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Paiwan people.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Paiwan language.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Chen Wei-chih, a 24-year-old Aborigine from the ''Paiwan'' tribe on the island's east coast, became a career officer in the battalion after peers in his home village convinced him to join the military.

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • A rattan staff was preserved by a Paiwan chiefly family well into the twentieth century. 86 The symbol of the rattan staff also appears to have inspired the rattan wand still used today by certain shamanesses. 87

    How Taiwan Became Chinese

  • "Well, here I am!" he said. 85 McGovern also found that, among the Paiwan (one of the main aboriginal peoples of Taiwan), the killing of strangers was considered an act of self-defense unless those strangers had fair hair and blue eyes — this, too, she interprets as evidence that the Dutch were revered.

    How Taiwan Became Chinese

  • The Japanese had moved quickly to establish Japanese language schools among the Paiwan in the south by 1896, says Barclay, but in the turbulent north matters took a different turn, and the Japanese were forced to engage in the complexities of local marriage politics.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • The Paiwan there are not the original Paiwan from the area.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • Today in Taiwan we hear about the American or European climbing methods, but Taiwan also has its own methods -- the Paiwan, the Rukai, the Bunung, all have their own way.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • The people who live in X today came to that place after the Paiwan moved.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • The original Paiwan people were moved to Pingtung 100 years ago by the Japanese government.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • On the eve of the Japanese invasion in 1874, American naturalist Joseph Steere confirmed the role of Aborigine women as mediators in commerce between mountain and plain: The Kale-whan [Paiwan], in times of scarcity, frequently sell their daughters to the Chinese and Pepo-whans [Peipoban/Pingpufan], who take them as supplementary wives and make them useful as interpreters in thus bartering with the savages.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • Forty years ago part of the original Paiwan moved back.

    Archive 2008-07-01

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