Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or relating to prehistoric human culture in the Western Hemisphere from the earliest habitation to around 5,000 BC. Paleo-Indian cultures are distinguished especially by the various projectile points they produced.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a member of the Paleo-American peoples who were the earliest human inhabitants of North America and South America during the late Pleistocene epoch

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The humans, a Paleo-Indian grouping known as the Clovis culture for the distinctive spear points they employed, suffered a major population drop, disappearing in many areas for hundreds of years.

    Boing Boing

  • Manachagui Cave contains stratified cultural deposits that span the latter Paleo-Indian period, and the Preceramic periods (approx 1800 BC to 1532 AD).

    Rio Abiseo National Park, Peru

  • Moreover, they added, archaeological evidence suggests the Clovis culture may have been relative latecomers to the Americas or descendants of earlier Paleo-Indian populations represented at archaeological sites such as Monte Verde in Chile.

    Archive 2008-03-01

  • The tool cache is one of only a handful of Clovis-age artifact caches that have been unearthed in North America, said Bamforth, who studies Paleo-Indian culture and tools.

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • The tool cache is one of only a handful of Clovis-age artifact caches that have been unearthed in North America, said Bamforth, who studies Paleo-Indian culture and tools.

    FACE OF SORROW HAIKU

  • Elsewhere in Central and South America, late Paleo-Indian and Archaic hunter-gatherers adapted to every kind of Holocene environment imaginable, from cold, oceanic coastlines in the far south to the dense rain forest in the Amazon basin and high-altitude plateaux in the Andes Mountains.

    6. Central and South Americans

  • Here Paleo-Indian, and later, more sophisticated Archaic big-game hunting cultures diversified over a period of more than 10,000 years, right into modern times.

    5. Paleo-Indian and Archaic North Americans

  • In the desert interior, Paleo-Indian and Archaic cultures developed a remarkable expertise with wild plant foods.

    5. Paleo-Indian and Archaic North Americans

  • For example, a band of Paleo-Indian hunters drove a large bison herd into a gully at Olsen-Chubbock, Colorado, in 6000 B.C.E. By analyzing the thousands of bison bones in the gully, archaeologists have managed to reconstruct the standardized butchery techniques the Indians used after the hunt.

    2. Food Remains

  • Whatever the cause of extinction, the disappearance of big game fostered greater cultural diversity among Paleo-Indian groups.

    H. The First Settlement of the Americas (c. 15,000 Years Ago)

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