Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pseudoscientific treatment in which two pointed metal rods ("tractors") were waved over the body, supposed to cure inflammation, rheumatism, etc. by drawing off an electrical fluid.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Perkins +‎ -ism, after inventor Elisha Perkins (1741–1799).

Examples

  • I believe it would have been found that most of these persons were of ardent temperament and of considerable imagination, and that their history would show that Perkinism was not the first nor the last hobby-horse they rode furiously.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • Perkinism, was very anxious to try the effects of tractoration upon this unfortunate blemish.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • And now, on reviewing the whole subject, how shall we account for the extraordinary prevalence of the belief in Perkinism among a portion of what is supposed to be the thinking part of the community?

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • It is, on the contrary, a most zealous defence of Perkinism, and a fierce attack upon its opponents, most especially upon such of the medical profession as treated the subject with neglect or ridicule.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • It was remarkable, also, that Perkinism, which had so little success with the medical and scientific part of the community, found great favor in the eyes of its more lovely and less obstinate portion.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • Dr. HAYGARTH, who was so conspicuous in exposing the follies of Perkinism, was among the very earliest to express his opinion in favor of vaccination.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • Major Oxholin, "-- I quote from Mr. Perkins's volume, --" having been lately in America, had seen and heard much of the great effects of Perkinism.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • Having thus sketched the history of Perkinism in its days of prosperity; having seen how it sprung into being, and by what means it maintained its influence, it only remains to tell the brief story of its discomfiture and final downfall.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • It will be seen, therefore, that, according to the recent statement of one of its leading English advocates, Homoeopathy had obtained not quite half as many practical disciples in England as Perkinism could show for itself in a somewhat less period from the time of its first promulgation in that country.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

  • I trust it will not be thought in any degree disrespectful to a profession which we all honor, that I have mentioned the great zeal of many clergymen in the cause of Perkinism.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

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