Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Archaic form of Persian.
  • n. Archaic form of Persian.
  • proper n. Archaic form of Persian.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin Persicus, from Ancient Greek περσικός (persikós).

Examples

  • Soffarian Dynasties) has been lately published in Persic and Latin,

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • Al-asnam as cases in point; but I should expect, for reasons before given, to find the stories in a Persic rather than an Arabic

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Afsánah is its being the archetype of The Nights, unquestionably proving that the Arab work borrows from the Persian bodily its cadre or frame-work, the principal characteristic; its exordium and its dénoûement, whilst the two heroines still bear the old Persic names.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Hazár Afsánah was translated from Persic into Arabic nearly a thousand years ago, it had ample time and verge enough to assume another and a foreign dress, the corpus however remaining untouched.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “Law of Moses,” before this was vivified and racially baptised by Mesopotamian and Persic influences.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Volumes are spoken by the fact that the Arab adapter did not venture to change the Persic names of the two heroines and of the royal brothers or to transfer the mise - en-scène any whither from Khorasan or outer Persia.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  •     One to be taught gross rites Persic, a Magian he.

    Poems and Fragments

  • The fortifications are on an Arabic Persic model — combining Arab neatness with

    How I Found Livingstone

  • It was an outlandish place, Galatia, a Celtic outpost in a sub-continent peopled by those of Persic, Syriac, Germanic and Hittite strains; all save the Syriacs tended to be fair, at least of skin, but not fair like these Celtic immigrants descended from the second King Brennus of the Gauls.

    The Grass Crown

  • Pontus yielded troops, of course, but its King was aware that their quality left much to be desired, for the Greeks who inhabited the coastal cities despised warfare — the native peoples, descendants of the Persic strains who had once lived around the south and west of the Hyrcanian Sea, were so backward they were almost impossible to train.

    The Grass Crown

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