Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A member of a legendary seafaring people fond of feasting and dancing, mentioned by the poet Homer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Phæacians, a fabulous seafaring people fond of the feast, the lyre, and the dance, mentioned by Homer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or belonging to Phæacia, or Scheria, an island described by Homer, doubtfully identified with the modern Corcyra.
  • An inhabitant of Phæacia, or Scheria; hence, a gourmand, the Phæacians having been noted for their luxury.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Alcinous bestow, and many Arete; moreover she gave Medea twelve Phaeacian handmaids from the palace, to bear her company.

    The Argonautica

  • Though the Phaeacians ultimately give him provisions to continue on his way home, a poorly timed insult from the son of the Phaeacian king awakens Odysseus's competitive athletic spirit.

    Lapham's Quarterly: "Sing to Me of The Man..."

  • There will be Phaeacian sea captains, pirates, and smugglers volunteering to serve any faction that is winning, no matter which side Alcinuous himself is on.

    Orphans of Chaos

  • That is why you need the help of a witch to stop the Phaeacian power.

    Orphans of Chaos

  • The poet finely says May I find in Phaeacian hearts, at my coming, goodwill and compassion; and these are the two things we should aim at.

    Rhetoric

  • Soon we see the cloud-capped Phaeacian towers sink away, skirt the shores of Epirus, and enter the Chaonian haven and approach high Buthrotum town.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • And they sacrificed all that men could provide for sacrifice on a desolate strand; wherefore when Medea's Phaeacian handmaids saw them pouring water for libations on the burning brands, they could no longer restrain laughter within their bosoms, for that ever they had seen oxen in plenty slain in the halls of Alcinous.

    The Argonautica

  • And when the Minyae departed many gifts of friendship did Alcinous bestow, and many Arete; moreover she gave Medea twelve Phaeacian handmaids from the palace, to bear her company.

    The Argonautica

  • From the day when the Phaeacian maidens started the ball rolling down to the present time, it has been continuously in motion, and as long as children love play and adults feel the need of exercise and recreation, it will continue to roll.

    Base-Ball How to Become a Player

  • Poseidon in anger at the arrival of the hero changed the returning Phaeacian ship into stone when it was almost within the harbour of the city.

    Authors of Greece

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