Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of Phaeacian.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As the Phaeacians are the best sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving, for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they are very intelligent.

    The Odyssey

  • I will show you the way to the town, and will tell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I am daughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested. "

    The Odyssey

  • Up he sprang, cloak and all, and seized a discus, huge and heavy, more weighty by far than those the Phaeacians used to hurl and test each other.

    Lapham's Quarterly: "Sing to Me of The Man..."

  • Still desperate to return to his family in Ithaca, Book 8 of Homer's Odyssey finds Odysseus shipwrecked in on the island of Scheria, home of the Phaeacians.

    Lapham's Quarterly: "Sing to Me of The Man..."

  • Though the Phaeacians ultimately give him provisions to continue on his way home, a poorly timed insult from the son of the Phaeacian king awakens Odysseus's competitive athletic spirit.

    Lapham's Quarterly: "Sing to Me of The Man..."

  • Aeolus, son of Hippotas, will check his swift rushing winds, all but the steady west wind, until they reach the havens of the Phaeacians; do thou devise a return without bane.

    The Argonautica

  • Phaeacians, and granted boundless wealth to the inhabitants.

    The Argonautica

  • Hyllus still alive in the land, whom fair Melite bare to Heracles in the land of the Phaeacians.

    The Argonautica

  • Arrival among the Phaeacians: here other Colchians reclaim Medea, and, to prevent her surrender, her marriage with Jason is celebrated (982 – 1169). —

    The Argonautica

  • Phaeacians; and thus the Phaeacians themselves are by birth of the blood of Uranus.

    The Argonautica

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