Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or relating to Phoebe or Phoebus
  • adj. Of or relating to the Sun. Solar.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Second part, _The delights of the Muses_, or Poems upon several occasions, both English and Latin; such rich pregnant Fancies as shewed his Breast to be filled with _Phoebean_

    The Lives of the Most Famous English Poets (1687)

  • There is something pathetic in the retirement of the grey-haired Perugino from Rome, to make way for the victorious Phoebean beauty of the boy Raphael.

    Renaissance in Italy Volume 3 The Fine Arts

  • Phoebean singer; to him the Renaissance reveals her joy and dowers him with her gift of melody.

    Renaissance in Italy Volume 3 The Fine Arts

  • May it not have been that he was a youth of more than ordinary promise, gifted with intellectual enthusiasms proportioned to his beauty and endowed with something of Phoebean inspiration, who, had he survived, might have even inaugurated a new age for the world, or have emulated the heroism of Hypatia in a hopeless cause?

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • Phoebean tripod, the river Cydnus, and the epigraphs 'Neos

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • Light falling upon carved forms of gods and heroes, bathing clear-cut columns and sharp basreliefs in simple lustre, was enough for the Phoebean rites of Hellas.

    Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete Series I, II, and III

  • _Phoebean dart_, a ray of the sun, Phoebus being the god of the sun. l.

    Keats: Poems Published in 1820

  • Sir _John Suckling_, in his time, the delight of the Court and darling of the Muses, was one so filled with _Phoebean_ fire, as for excellency of his wit, was worthy to be Crowned with a Wreath of Stars, though some attribute the strength of his lines to favour more of the Grape than the Lamp; Indeed he made it his Recreation, not his Study, and did not so much seek fame as it was put upon him: In my mind he gives the best Character of himself in those Verses of his in the _Sessions of the Poets_:

    The Lives of the Most Famous English Poets (1687)

  • Sir John Suckling, in his time, the delight of the Court and darling of the Muses, was one so filled with Phoebean fire, as for excellency of his wit, was worthy to be Crowned with a Wreath of Stars, though some attribute the strength of his lines to favour more of the Grape than the Lamp; Indeed he made it his Recreation, not his Study, and did not so much seek fame as it was put upon him: In my mind he gives the best Character of himself in those Verses of his in the

    The Lives of the Most Famous English Poets

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