Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun One of the Seven Sages of Greece living c. 640-568 BC. He was a native of Mytilene.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Πίττακος (Pittakos).

Examples

  • But Soclarus, in defence of my sons, said: Alcaeus (as the story goes) did not call Pittacus a night-supper for supping late, but for delighting in base and scandalous company.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • But Soclarus, in defence of my sons, said: Alcaeus (as the story goes) did not call Pittacus a night-supper for supping late, but for delighting in base and scandalous company.

    Symposiacs

  • Booktrack's premiere title, "The Power of Six" by Pittacus Lore, is widely speculated to have been penned by Mr. Frey and his writing partner, Jobie Hughes , but the author denied the claim.

    'I'm Done Writing Books,' Says Frey

  • " I Am Number Four, " a $60 million teen sci-fi thriller due for release in February, is based on a best-selling book that cited " Pittacus Lore " .

    James Frey

  • Edonian country joined him, Pittacus the king of the Edonians having been assassinated by the children of Goaxis and Brauro his wife.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • Then you and I are prepared to take up arms against anyone who attributes such a saying to Simonides or Bias or Pittacus, or any other wise man or seer?

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • Myrcinus, an Edonian town, also came over to him; the Edonian king Pittacus having been killed by the sons of Goaxis and his own wife Brauro; and Galepsus and

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • To say the truth, in a court of justice drunkenness must not be an excuse, yet in a court of conscience it is greatly so; and therefore Aristotle, who commends the laws of Pittacus, by which drunken men received double punishment for their crimes, allows there is more of policy than justice in that law.

    The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • Sixthly, Pittacus spake thus, If he could so treat his subjects that they feared not him but for him.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Pittacus laughed at this reply, and Aesop told them this fable: The wolf seeing a parcel of shepherds in their booth feeding upon a lamb, approaching near them, — What a bustle and noise and uproar would there have been, saith he, if I had but done what you do!

    Essays and Miscellanies

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