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Examples

  • After that date his tendency to trade-dealings in Poetry and the like is so manifest in the Stationers 'records that I find appended to my MS. notes, from these records, for the London Bibliography of the year 1646, this memorandum: -- "_Poetry and Pure Literature looking up again this year, and chiefly through the medium of Moseley's shop. _"

    The Life of John Milton Volume 3 1643-1649

  • This is not only an act of justice, but in our decisions upon poetry especially, may conduce in a high degree to the improvement of our own taste: for an _accurate_ taste in Poetry and in all the other arts, as Sir Joshua Reynolds has observed, is an _acquired_ talent, which can only be produced by thought and a long continued intercourse with the best models of composition.

    Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems, 1800, Volume 1

  • Principles of Poetry, "which forms the introduction to Gayley and Young's _Principles and Progress of English Poetry_.

    Children's Literature A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes

  • After all, "Poetry" comes from a Greek work which means "to make," so Poetry is the art of making something out of nothing.

    France and Canada

  • One of the charms of How to Be Well-Versed in Poetry is that it has something for readers at all levels — from beginners to scholars who want to refresh their memories of what a nonet or tanka is.

    E.O. Parrott’s Witty Guide to the Different Kinds of Poetry « One-Minute Book Reviews

  • You observe that I avoid the term Poetry, over which the critics have waged, and still are waging, a war that promises to be endless.

    III. On the Difference between Verse and Prose

  • While discussing, very much at random, the essentiality of what we call Poetry, my principal purpose will be to cite for consideration some few of those minor English or American poems which best suit my own taste, or which upon my own fancy have left the most definite impression.

    The Poetic Principle

  • Orpheus, with eloquence grown rhythmic, musical (what we call Poetry), drew iron tears from the cheek of Pluto: but by what witchery of rhyme or prose wilt thou from the pocket of Plutus draw gold?

    The French Revolution

  • While discussing, very much at random, the essentiality of what we call Poetry, my principal purpose will be to cite for consideration, some few of those minor English or American poems which best suit my own taste, or which, upon my own fancy, have left the most definite impression.

    The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 5

  • Flowers graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Vanderbilt University and received his M.F.A. in Poetry from the University of Oregon.

    2006 » November

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