Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The Pontic Greek dialect of the historical Pontus region of Asia Minor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One such example is a Pontian song depicting voluntary sacrifice.

    Arms and the Woman: Just Warriors and Greek Feminist Identity

  • This ecoregion is mostly equivalent to the lowland and montane Black Sea deciduous mixed forests found on the Pontian uplands.

    Euxine-Colchic deciduous forests

  • I have postulated that Pontian flora and fauna were contemporaneous with the Mediterranean flood.

    The Golden Torc

  • Ramapithecus, that enigmatic and fascinating hominid of many aliases, is placed as late as the Pontian by virtue of a jaw described in 1972 by G.H. R. von Koenigswald, to which he gave the name Graecopithecus freybergi.

    The Golden Torc

  • The climate, geography, vegetation, and animal life of Pontian times are essentially as set forth in the novel-but geologists and paleobiologists will be quick to detect a few fudgings that I hope can be forgiven in the spirit of good fun.

    The Golden Torc

  • After he had delivered, with floods of tears, a speech in praise of Tiberius, and buried him with the utmost pomp, he immediately hastened over to Pandataria and the Pontian islands [398], to bring thence the ashes of his mother and brother; and, to testify the great regard he had for their memory, he performed the voyage in a very tempestuous season.

    The Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Volume 04: Caligula

  • After he had delivered, with floods of tears, a speech in praise of Tiberius, and buried him with the utmost pomp, he immediately hastened over to Pandataria and the Pontian islands [398], to bring thence the ashes of his mother and brother; and, to testify the great regard he had for their memory, he performed the voyage in a very tempestuous season.

    De vita Caesarum

  • Finally, at a much later period, under Pontian of Rome and Zebinus of Antioch (Eusebius, VI, xxiii), he journeyed into Greece, passing through Caesarea where Theoctistus,

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • It is related in these Acts that their bodies were buried by a subdeacon, Quirinus, and transferred in the reign of Constantine to the Pontian cemetery on the road to Porto, near the gates of Rome.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • How much longer Pontian endured the sufferings of exile and harsh treatment in the Sardinian mines is unknown.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.