Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A futuristic design style of the late 1950s and early 1960s often using pastel colors, synthetic materials, and stainless steel and evoking a sense of luxury.
  • adjective Of or relating to this design style.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Blend of popular and deluxe.]

Examples

  • The Sub T is a classic Chicago bar space, meaning long, narrow, dark, and architecturally mongrel: I was especially taken by the tiling behind the bar, a Populuxe pattern that wouldn't be out of place in Betty Draper's kitchen, but which in this context looks like a prom queen seated uncomfortably amidst a clutch of Dickensian reprobates.

    Robert Rodi: Four Horns, One Siren: Black Bear Combo and the Rebecca Sullivan Quintet

  • For instance, the Nippon NEAC 2203 from 1960 (pictured in the spread below) has the same clean and angular “Populuxe” look shared by cars from the same era.

    Book Review: Core Memory : Scrubbles.net

  • A decade that had to invent all that surely can be forgiven its gauche tail fins and ducktails, its Hula Hoops and Contact-papered Populuxe kitchens.

    The '50S

  • In particular, Populuxe (which looks at design history and consumer psychology after WWII) and The Total Package: The Total Package: The Secret History and Hidden Meanings of Boxes, Bottles, Cans, and Other Persuasive Container (kinda self explanatory).

    Loophole Response; Hitchens on Gibson; How to Make Working Gorilla Masks

  • The Sub T is a classic Chicago bar space, meaning long, narrow, dark, and architecturally mongrel: I was especially taken by the tiling behind the bar, a Populuxe pattern that wouldn't be out of place in Betty Draper's kitchen, but which in this context looks like a prom queen seated uncomfortably amidst a clutch of Dickensian reprobates.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • A sequel of sorts to the successful Populuxe (which smartly considered cultural curlicues of the 1950s and ’60s), Hine’s latest social history is half as satisfying.

    Cover to Cover

  • A sequel of sorts to the successful Populuxe (which smartly considered cultural curlicues of the 1950s and ’60s), Hine’s latest social history is half as satisfying.

    Cover to Cover

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