Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • "Prominent" - and I use the term loosely here - deniers like Dennis Avery, S. Fred Singer and Michael Asher have made a cottage industry of playing loose with the numbers and extrapolating short-term trends to make sweeping statements about global warming (see: one unusually cold month means global warming is over).

    Jeremy Jacquot: Hot or Not? Making Sense of Climate Variability

  • "Prominent" - and I use the term loosely here - deniers like Dennis Avery, S. Fred Singer and

    DeSmogBlog - Clearing the PR Pollution that Clouds Climate Science

  • Khryapa; Cs Joel Przybilla, Theo Ratliff, Ha Seung-Jin Prominent Free Agents:

    USATODAY.com

  • The person said the property, called Prominent Hill, represents a significant part of OZ Minerals 'overall value, but less than half of the company's enterprise value -- a measure of the company's worth that includes debt and equity.

    Australia Blocks China Takeover

  • A DAY LATER, March 23, the JCS began an exercise called Prominent Hammer, a so-called tabletop paper drill without actual movement of forces.

    Plan of Attack

  • A DAY LATER, March 23, the JCS began an exercise called Prominent Hammer, a so-called tabletop paper drill without actual movement of forces.

    Plan of Attack

  • Brian Skinner, Greg Ostertag Prominent Free Agents: Gs Cuttino Mobley

    USATODAY.com

  • I don't know what kind of style sheet they work off at Newsmax, but the use of "Prominent" feels like kind of an exaggeration.

    Chris Kelly: Prominent Democrats Back McCain

  • "'Prominent' critics now pronounce on what informs the intellectuality of one, (Darwinism, one ventures falsely), critics favoured by certain sections of the biased media, who will take only certain views and no other complete the picture of cultural activists at work."

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • _ 'Prominent, meaningless eyes; without being actually ugly, a very unpleasant face, with an animal expression; large and stout, but with weak, helpless legs.

    Lectures and Essays

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