Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Greek antiquity, the priestess who held communion with Apollo and received his oracles in the inner sanctuary of the great temple at Delphi, throughout historic antiquity. See oracle.
  • noun In conchology: A genus of gastropods of the family Auriculidæ, generally called Scarabus.
  • noun A genus of bulimiform shells, comprising species of Achatina, Bulimus, Glandina, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun The priestess of Pythian Apollo, the Oracle of Delphi

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (Greek mythology) the priestess of Apollo at Delphi who transmitted the oracles

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Greek Πυθία, from Πυθώ+-ία.

Examples

  • “Not high enough to give me the title of Pythia, no matter how hard I worked.”

    Dark Oracle

  • And she’d made no secret of the fact she wanted the title of Pythia.

    Dark Oracle

  • “She thinks you’re competition for the title of Pythia.”

    Dark Oracle

  • Like you said, the Pythia is a pretty determined bitch.

    Dark Oracle

  • Tara appreciated the fire aspect of it the Pythia was a pyromancer, after all, but thought the small, tippy chair looked terribly uncomfortable.

    Dark Oracle

  • Young woman called Pythia sniffed these vapors and uttered sheer gibberish, which the priests then interpreted to answer the questions of visitors.

    Question Quest

  • Young woman called Pythia sniffed these vapors and uttered sheer gibberish, which the priests then interpreted to answer the questions of visitors.

    Question Quest

  • The Pythia was a stupid old woman, saving when she sat upon the tripod.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 102, April, 1866

  • The priestess who delivered the oracles was called the Pythia, after the serpent Python, which was killed by Apollo.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • The Castalian fountain still gushes out at the bottom, into a large square enclosure, called the Pythia's Bath, and now choked up with mud, weeds, and stones.

    Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 8 Italy and Greece, Part Two

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