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    A quiet client who causes no community disturbance is deemed "improved" no matter how miserable or incapacitated that person may feel as a result.

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    >>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentalism_(discrimination)

    Interpretations of behaviors, and applications of treatments, may be done in an arrogant unjustified way because of an underlying mentalism.

    If the recipient disagrees or does not change, they may be labeled as "non-compliant" "uncooperative" or "treatment-resistant".

    This is despite the fact that it may be due to inadequate understanding of the person or his/her problems, medication adverse effects, a poor match between the treatment and the person's lifestyle, stigma associated with the treatment, difficulty with access, cultural unacceptability or many other issues.

    Mentalism may lead people to assume that a person isn't aware of what they're doing and that there is no point trying to communicate with them, despite the fact that they may well have a level of awareness and desire to connect even if they are acting in a seemingly irrational or self-harming way.

    In addition, mental health clinicians tend to equate subduing a person with treatment; a quiet client who causes no community disturbance is deemed "improved" no matter how miserable or incapacitated that person may feel as a result.

    Clinicians may blame clients for not being sufficiently motivated to work on treatment goals, or as "acting out" when their own goals are not supported. It is argued, however, that in the majority of cases this is actually due to the client having been treated in a disrespectful, judgmental, or dismissive manner.

    Such mentalist behavior may again be justifed by blaming the person as having been demanding, angry or "needing limits", but it is argued that power-sharing can nevertheless be cultivated and that when respectful communication breaks down, the first thing that needs to be asked is whether mentalist prejudices have been expressed.

    January 3, 2010